SAE – Dictionary Corner – Publishing Terms Translated

Have you ever spoken to someone in publishing or browsed the submission portion of an agency’s website and wondered what on earth we’re all talking about?

Well, wonder no more. Here in Dictionary Corner we will strive to shed some light on the technical jargon and industry lingos that often confuse new writers.

SAE – we throw this term around all the time as if everyone will surely know what it means. But why would you? Especially in this brave new digital world. SAE means Stamped Addressed Envelope.

If you submit to us in the post and you want your work returned to you we ask that you include an SAE. This just means that you need to get an envelope big enough to fit everything in it, write your address on the front and put enough stamps/postage on it to get your work back to you from our office in London. Then you simply slip this in with your covering letter, synopsis and first three consecutive sample chapters.

If you don’t want your work returned to you please let us know and remember to include either a small SAE for our reply or an email address that we can contact you on instead.

We will feel particularly warm towards your submission if you do all of these things rather than just some of them. We make a point of responding to all submissions but we are constantly receiving submissions with only a few stamps clipped onto them or accompanied by a plain, unstamped envelope and no address to be found and so on. This makes sending our responses out all the more time-consuming.

Seeing your submission accompanied by a neatly addressed envelope with the correct amount of stamps already helpfully stuck into place gives us a warm, stress-free glow.

Are there any terms we use that befuddle you? Please do let us know by leaving a comment or emailing assistant@darleyanderson.com and we’ll respond with our own personal definition just for you.

By Vicki Le Feuvre

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This entry was posted in Dictionary Corner, Editorial, Submissions and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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