Tag Archives: dictionary corner

New Adult – Dictionary Corner – Publishing Terms Translated

Have you ever spoken to someone in publishing or browsed the submission portion of an agency’s website and wondered what on earth we’re all talking about?

Well, wonder no more. Here in Dictionary Corner we will strive to shed some light on the technical jargon and industry lingos that often confuse new writers.

New Adult

It’s the readership category that has taken the publishing world by storm recently.

Which is odd, because the term has been around for at least three years. The earliest use of the term that we can find was in 2009 when St Martin’s Press launched a competition looking for fiction that was ‘kind of an older YA or “new adult.”’

And that basically sums up what ‘new adult’ is: fiction for older young adults. Specifically it’s fiction aimed at 14-35 year olds (quite a wide spectrum you might think).

It will have storylines that will be enjoyed by older teenagers, twenty-somethings and the people newly into their thirties alike but which might include themes that would not be appropriate for the tweenagers and younger.

They will largely be coming-of-age stories and will cover the difficult in-between years that have yet to really find their place in the market.

Often the protagonist will begin as a teenager and will grow up over the course of the plot, encountering events that will be of interest to all people across this age bracket but which might be less riveting to your average reader fast approaching or fondly remembering their 40th birthday. Accordingly, books set during the university years appear to be at the epicentre of this new genre.

It seems to be generally agreed that novels which can be called ‘new adult’ will include scenes of a sexual nature. They may also have themes of violence and the characters are allowed to swear as much as they want.

There has been much debate on the issue already. You should check out the articles and discussions online for more information because it is quite interesting how this is dividing opinions.

As far as we can tell ‘new adult’ fiction is basically akin to a movie rated 15 rather than PG-12. When publishers call something ‘new adult’ they will basically be saying: people in their late teens will love it, young professionals will love it, but maybe keep it away from the under 14s until they’re a little older.

By Vicki Le Feuvre

Literary Agency – Dictionary Corner – Publishing Terms Translated

Have you ever spoken to someone in publishing or browsed the submission portion of an agency’s website and wondered what on earth we’re all talking about?

Well, wonder no more. Here in Dictionary Corner we will strive to shed some light on the technical jargon and industry lingos that often confuse new writers.

Literary Agency – We often receive calls from prospective authors asking what a literary agent actually does.

Well, to put it as simply as possible, we sell our authors’ work to publishers.

A literary agent basically acts like an actor’s agent or an estate agent but for authors instead of actors or reasonably priced two bedroom apartments, fully furnished within walking distance of the number 42 bus and other local amenities.

More specifically, here is what being a Literary Agency means to us at the Darley Anderson Agency:

The first step in our process is talent-spotting. That’s where you come in. We actively search out the most exciting new talents around by reading hundreds of submissions on a weekly basis, attending writing events and by doing things like creating this blog to help fledgling writers to find their feet (and to find us).

If we sign you to the agency we may well offer editorial support first of all to make sure that your work is at its very best before we take it to the publishers.

Then comes the deal-making. Our agents have expert knowledge of the publishing industry (which as you can tell from the sheer size of the Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook is very large and potentially confusing from an outsider’s perspective). They will know exactly who to approach on your behalf and, as skilled negotiators, they will always get the best deal for you and your writing.

On top of that we will handle the foreign rights of your work. This means that we will take your writing to publishers all over the world. Our foreign rights team works tirelessly in foreign markets to fill our authors’ bookshelves with editions of their work in every known language (keep an eye on Dictionary Corner for more on this at a later date).

In addition to all of that we provide advice and author care which can be essential to an author’s long-term career. We can act as a sounding board for new ideas, support you at publishing events and basically fight your corner in any disputes or issues that you face as a writer. To summarise, we’ll have your back.

Are there any terms we use that befuddle you? Please do let us know by leaving a comment or emailing assistant@darleyanderson.com and we’ll respond with our own personal definition just for you.

By Vicki Le Feuvre

Dictionary Corner – Publishing Terms Translated

Have you ever spoken to someone in publishing or browsed the submission portion of an agency’s website and wondered what on earth we’re all talking about?

Well, wonder no more. Here in Dictionary Corner we will strive to shed some light on the technical jargon and industry lingos that often confuse new writers.

Synopsis – We don’t mean to patronise, we’re sure you know what ‘synopsis’ means. But this is what we personally want to see when we request a synopsis:

An outline of all the important events in the novel with no elusive references to what might happen or incomplete conclusions along the lines of ‘and what they discover will change their lives forever…’. Spoilers are well and truly welcome.

Ideally it will be a page long and will introduce all the major characters and themes as well as thoroughly giving away the ending.

Are there any terms we use that befuddle you? Please do let us know by leaving a comment or emailing assistant@darleyanderson.com and we’ll respond with our own personal definition just for you.

By Vicki Le Feuvre

SAE – Dictionary Corner – Publishing Terms Translated

Have you ever spoken to someone in publishing or browsed the submission portion of an agency’s website and wondered what on earth we’re all talking about?

Well, wonder no more. Here in Dictionary Corner we will strive to shed some light on the technical jargon and industry lingos that often confuse new writers.

SAE – we throw this term around all the time as if everyone will surely know what it means. But why would you? Especially in this brave new digital world. SAE means Stamped Addressed Envelope.

If you submit to us in the post and you want your work returned to you we ask that you include an SAE. This just means that you need to get an envelope big enough to fit everything in it, write your address on the front and put enough stamps/postage on it to get your work back to you from our office in London. Then you simply slip this in with your covering letter, synopsis and first three consecutive sample chapters.

If you don’t want your work returned to you please let us know and remember to include either a small SAE for our reply or an email address that we can contact you on instead.

We will feel particularly warm towards your submission if you do all of these things rather than just some of them. We make a point of responding to all submissions but we are constantly receiving submissions with only a few stamps clipped onto them or accompanied by a plain, unstamped envelope and no address to be found and so on. This makes sending our responses out all the more time-consuming.

Seeing your submission accompanied by a neatly addressed envelope with the correct amount of stamps already helpfully stuck into place gives us a warm, stress-free glow.

Are there any terms we use that befuddle you? Please do let us know by leaving a comment or emailing assistant@darleyanderson.com and we’ll respond with our own personal definition just for you.

By Vicki Le Feuvre

Exclusive – Dictionary Corner – Publishing Terms Translated

Have you ever spoken to someone in publishing or browsed the submission portion of an agency’s website and wondered what on earth we’re all talking about?

Well, wonder no more. Here in Dictionary Corner we will strive to shed some light on the technical jargon and industry lingos that often confuse new writers.

Exclusive – this is a very important word for us and one you really want to hear from agents.

The word applies in exactly the same context as it does in a romantic relationship. If we ask to see more of your work exclusively it means that we like what we’ve seen so far and we want to see more but that we don’t want anyone else to be seeing any.

If you offer your work on exclusive with an agent you are promising that no one else in the industry will be reading or considering any part of your concept at the same time as that agent.

Also, if you are submitting to us and nobody else please do slip this word into your covering letter. We like to hear it too!

Are there any terms we use that befuddle you? Please do let us know by leaving a comment or emailing assistant@darleyanderson.com and we’ll respond with our own personal definition just for you.

By Vicki Le Feuvre