An Interview with Dave Rudden

Dave Rudden, agented by our own Clare Wallace, is the debut author of The Borrowed Dark trilogy which has recently been snapped up by Puffin Editorial Director Ben Horslen in a significant pre-emptive deal. The translation rights have already been sold in France and Germany in a six-figure pre-empt and the film rights are currently being hotly fought over.

Vicki Le Feuvre was able to grab a moment with Dave between all his recent radio interviews to discuss everything that has changed for him since he brought his brilliant protagonist, Denizen Hardwick, into the wider world.

Dave Rudden, debut author of The Borrowed Dark

Dave Rudden, debut author of The Borrowed Dark

Vicki Le Feuvre: So, to get this ball rolling I wanted to first of all ask: on a scale of one to ten how psyched are you? Because I think we’re levelling off at about a constant 52 at this point.

Dave Rudden: My feet honestly haven’t touched ground since I got that first phone call (on the morning of my twenty-sixth birthday, if you can believe it).

VLF: Where were you when you got the call from Clare Wallace telling you about the six-figure deal she’d made with Puffin Editorial Director Ben Horslen for World English rights of your trilogy?

DR: I was in a Pound World on George’s Street in Dublin, counting the change in my pocket and dubiously eyeing 50p packets of soup. Needless to say, it was a very welcome phone call.

VLF: What has changed in your life since that day or are we still in the calm before the storm, do you think?

DR: I’ve received a lot of lovely congratulations messages but overall I think it’s still the calm before the storm, which I’m actually really pleased about. I’m currently working on the sequel to The Borrowed Dark and I’m hoping the Spring 2016 release date means I’ll have all three books finished and ready to go by the time the first one comes out. That means I can relax and enjoy it! (or start the next book to be honest, I wouldn’t know what to do with myself if I wasn’t writing).

VLF: The German and the French translation rights for The Borrowed Dark have already been sold. Do you speak either of these languages or do you have any plans to get Rosetta Stone-ing so you can read your translations?

DR: I am hilariously awful at languages, much to the disappointment of every Irish teacher I’ve ever had. There’s a French character in the book and the Knights of Borrowed Darkness [important figures in the trilogy] use a lot of Latin so there are phrases in other languages littered throughout the book. Luckily I have a few French and one Medievalist scholar friend (doesn’t everyone?) and they do some translating for me, which I promptly mangle in the service of good prose.

VLF: Let’s talk about The Borrowed Dark – because everyone else is now. Could you summarise the heart of your story in tweet form?

DR: Denizen Hardwick believes heroism should be optional but he’s just been thrust into an ancient war between iron-handed Knights and horrors from the dark end of creation and it’s proving rather hard to find anyone to agree with him.

VLF: We’ve all fallen for your brilliant protagonist, Denizen Hardwick. So we wanted to know how he came to be. Did he spring to life fully formed, perhaps frowning over a pile of books? Or was there more of a process to his creation?

DR: Denizen came from a lot of places. I wanted to write a character who wasn’t a natural hero, a teenager who questioned things. Denizen Hardwick has read far too many books at this stage of his life. It has always bothered him that when people find out there’s a magical world beside their own they immediately sign up without inquiring about dark lords, giant lizards, ancient curses or inconvenient prophecies.

He has absolutely no illusions about how long he would last in a world like that, which is of course why I decided to pitch him into one. The fun part is watching him learn that it’s that scepticism that actually makes him perfect for the role of hero. The really fun part is watching him fight that realisation for as long as possible.

I owe his name to the fantastically talented Dee Sullivan, writer of the Prim series of YA novels. We meet for writing sessions every few weeks and after a long and strange conversation she basically dropped the name ‘Denizen Hardwick’ in my lap.

VLF: We’re almost at the end of our 11 Ways Not To Start Your Novel series on here. If I can gush for a moment, your first line of The Borrowed Dark was what immediately sold me, personally, on your writing. One sentence in and I was already convinced. Do you have any tips on how to write a gripping first line?

DR: ‘Looking back, it had been a mistake to fill the orphanage with books.’

Your first line is your introduction. It’s your handshake. Your first shared smile. Put yourself in the mind of the reader and decide what reaction you want from them in that first moment.

They don’t know how deep your prose is or how exciting you’ve made the end of Chapter 3 – they’re standing in Waterstones and they’ve opened your book out of idle curiosity. You need to hook them from the first line.

I wanted to sum up the tone of the novel as much as possible in my opening, to let them know that this is a novel with a dark smile, a jaunty wave and absolutely no regard for the safety of children.

VLF: If you had to pick, what would you say is your favourite first line of all time?

DR: It’s very difficult to choose but there’s something so simple, eerie and wonderful about the first line of 1984.

'It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.'

‘It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.’

In just a few short words we’re made uneasy – the day is bright, but cold, the clocks are striking an unfamiliar bell – and we know that this world is like our own but wrong in all the little, important ways.

VLF: We always like to ask authors a little bit about their writing process when they come on here. Where do you write? And do you have any particular rituals or requirements?

DR: During the week, I have a pretty strict regime of a thousand words a day. I’m not one of those writers that can keep a whole novel’s possibilities in his head – I need to write it out, try different things, block the scenes and then go back later and fix them up.

I’ll write anywhere, but I get the most work done when I manage to drag myself to a café that does not have Internet access. The Internet is a wild and wonderful place, and unfortunately I am as distractible as a puppy.

VLF: When you’re not writing what are your favourite things to do? (Aside from sleeping and eating to facilitate more writing, of course.)

DR: I perform regularly as a poet and storyteller on Dublin’s art scene, as well as working on the committees of iBbY (The International Board of Books for Young People) and IrishPEN. I also organise fundraisers for literary and theatre concerns, and act as part of the Risky Proximity Players, a theatre company that adapts the work of horror writer Graham Tugwell. Basically anything that allows me to swan about being loud and theatrical.

VLF: One of the things we love most about Denizen’s character is his appetite for books. When you were his age what was your favourite book?

Terry Pratchett. Anything by Terry Pratchett.

Pictured: Anything by Terry Pratchett

Pictured: Anything by Terry Pratchett

VLF: This question comes from our Rights Executive, Mary Darby, who wants to know if you were ever afraid of the dark as a child and that’s why you created a whole order of knights to protect us from it?

DR: Any time I was outside at night I was firmly convinced that the dark was full of monsters but that as long as I didn’t run or didn’t turn around I was safe. That might have something to do with the creation of the tenebrous – they’re undefined in the dark and only take shape when they come into the light.

VLF: A lot of aspiring writers visit our blog. What would your top five tips be to new writers just going into the submission process, as someone who has come out the other side a success?

DR:

  1. Farm out your manuscript to people so you get another set of eyes. Join a writers’ group, harass your friends (as I did) and make sure you’ve looked at your novel from every angle before you send it out.
  2. READ THE AGENTS’ REQUIREMENTS. They will be very clear in their preferred format and you want them on your side from the get-go.
  3. Choose the agent you contact carefully. Do your research on each agency and make sure that your crime novel is going to the agent that deals with crime, or YA to their YA representative. Check their client lists and make sure your manuscript is going to someone as passionate about the genre as you are.
  4. Be patient. You’ll get rejections – not because the manuscript is bad, but because it mightn’t be what they’re looking for, or they’re already representing someone who’s doing something similar, or any one of a thousand reasons you’re not privy to. Keep the rejections that offer constructive feedback, forget the rest.
  5. Read this blog. Little bit of shameful self-promotion, but I wrote a blog for the Dublin Writers’ Festival about the process I went through where I go into detail about cover letters and synopses. I hope it helps!

VLF: Before you go, what was it about the Darley Anderson Children’s Book Agency that made you think – these guys are the ones for me? (Feel free to be as complimentary as you like, we don’t mind.)

DR: I did a lot of research on agencies before sending The Borrowed Dark out and there are a lot of very complimentary forum articles about Darley Anderson out there, not just from writers who’ve been signed but even from people who didn’t make it all the way through the submission process. The general consensus is that DA are lovely people as well as being terribly efficient and I’m glad to say that’s something I can attest to myself!

VLF: And finally, the question I’m sure you get asked constantly. Who would win in a fight – Denizen or Superman?

DR: I’m cruel to Denizen sometimes, but I’m not that cruel.

Puffin will be publishing The Borrowed Dark, the first instalment in Dave Rudden’s gripping trilogy, in Spring 2016. Until then you can follow him on Twitter: @dreadfulnotion.

Posted in Darley Anderson Authors, Interviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ask the Angels – What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Camilla?

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! (Otherwise known as the day we finally settled the immortal question of just what is the best love story ever told.)

All this week we’ve been giving Darley’s angels a chance to vote for the love story that they think should win the title of Best Love Story of All Time.

Emma, Andrea, Sheila, Vicki and Clare have all nominated their favourites and now agent Camilla Wray has the final word:

Camilla, what is the best love story of all time?

The question of which is my favourite love story is something that has been tucked into my pocket and carried around all week. There are definitely the greatest love stories of all; Love Story, Romeo & Juliet, The Time Traveller’s Wife to name only a few. Tales where One Great Love smashes through a life leaving everyone dizzy and breathless. But with these stories there is also the greatest sadness.

Tragedy is One Great Love’s best friend and as a loveaholic the danger of our addiction is the gut-wrenching catastrophic effect death has on love.

So with my Valentine’s heart on my sleeve I’m unable to cope with considering the thought of such sadness. This is why my answer is turning to what I call the Quiet Love Stories. A love not without history, drama or disaster, but it is grown from hope, kindness and a calmness that allows you just to be, together, forever.

For me a book that has this in every way is Jilly Cooper’s The Man Who Made Husband’s Jealous.

It doesn’t have the intensity, plotting or perhaps epic proportions of the great love stories, but it is the Queen and King partnership of Quiet Love and it really touched my heart.

Lysander Hawkley is a beautiful, lost and misjudged man. He’s a son that craves attention from his father and a human that just wants to belong. When he meets Kitty, the plump, average wife of tyrant Rannaldini, they start an unlikely courtship; one full of the laughter,
support and gentleness neither have ever been allowed before. And it is through these moments of being that a Quiet Love is born.

Alongside this wonderful love story is also that of the infamous Rupert Campbell-Black and Taggie O’Hara. All Jilly Cooper fans will have an opinion on ravishing Rupert and in the series he’s a dark character with his demons and danger a plenty. As the series progresses though we have flashes of an unexpected man and our defences are broken down. He is a man of honour and loyalty, yet he’s also a child at heart and someone craving a love that will quietly hold him up until he can believe in himself.

Taggie O’Hara is his Quiet Love. A coltish beauty who sufferers from terrible shyness and dyslexia she represents to him everything he isn’t, and it is Rupert recognising this in Taggie that makes him a better man.

Quiet love

Quiet love

What do you think? Is The Man Who Made Husbands Jealous the best love story ever told? Did you side with any of the other angels instead? Or perhaps you think we’re all crackers and completely failed to mention the obvious winner?

Cast your vote in the comments below.

Posted in Ask the Angels, Interviews, Meet the DA team | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ask the Angels – What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Clare?

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! (Otherwise known as the day where people seem to be carrying around a lot more flowers than is usual.)

It’s time for us to decide once and for all what the best love story of all time is.

All this week we’ve been posting a new answer each day from one of Darley’s angels. But because today is the big day of love itself we’re giving you two answers for the price of one from two of our top agents nonetheless.

Let’s get the day off to a LOVEly start with our Head of Rights and Associate Agent, Clare Wallace:

Clare, what is the best love story of all time?

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Read it before the film comes out later this year

Read it before the film comes out later this year

Okay, so this probably isn’t the ‘best’ love story of all time. But when Vicki asked us to write a Valentine’s article for the blog this was the first title I thought of.

For those of you who haven’t already read The Fault in Our Stars (and if you haven’t go and start reading it, like, now) it’s about a teenage girl, Hazel, who has terminal lung cancer and is encouraged by her parents to attend a cancer support group. Here she meets the charming, witty, gorgeous, and in remission, Augustus Waters.

This book is about a lot of things besides cancer, and love is one of them. The two main characters are beautifully drawn; they are bright, funny, courageous, and warm. They are exceptional people in exceptional circumstances. They are also two angsty teenagers falling in love.

At times I found this book difficult to read. The reality of a serious illness doesn’t make for light escapism. But I couldn’t put it down. I smiled and winced and laughed and cried (on the tube) and was absorbed in every word of Hazel’s story, right to its breathtaking, heartbreaking, star-crossed conclusion.

*breaks down sobbing*

*breaks down sobbing*

What do you think? Is The Fault in Our Stars the best love story of all time? Let us know in the comments.

Posted in Ask the Angels, Interviews, Meet the DA team | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Ask the Angels – What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Vicki?

Well, it’s that time of year again. The week of love is here (otherwise known as the week when people everywhere in brand new relationships find themselves wishing that the rules were clearer as they wildly fluctuate between buying a gift which involves more than one diamond or tweeting their new significant other a picture of a giraffe in a bowtie).

We’ve been getting into the Valentine’s Day spirit here at the agency and we thought it was about time we asked Darley’s angels to decide once and for all what the best love story of all time is.

We’ll be posting a new answer every day this week and today our Agency Editor, Vicki Le Feuvre, tells us which she would choose:

Vicki, what is the best love story of all time?

The story goes that Gilbert Ryle was once asked if he ever read any novels and he replied, “oh yes. All six, every year.” Any of those six novels he was referring to, the lot of them written by Miss Jane Austen, might happily qualify as the greatest love story of all time.

But the one for me is Persuasion.

Gilbert Ryle - philosopher of Oxford, reader of Austen, sitter of deckchairs

Gilbert Ryle – philosopher of Oxford, reader of Austen, sitter of deckchairs

Anne Elliot, has always been overlooked by most everyone in her life, “her word had no weight, her convenience was always to give way – she was only Anne.” So much so that when she falls for the only man she will ever love, Captain Frederick Wentworth, and has the good fortune to find him returning her feelings she ends up being persuaded that the match is not in her or his best interests, the latter being all that concerns her.

Eight years of regret later and Anne is all of seven and twenty and it is generally agreed by anyone in her circle who cares to notice her that she has quite lost any bloom of youth she may have once had. When several twists of fate conspire to bring Captain Wentworth back into her life she finds herself just as in love with him as ever but he, it seems, cannot forgive her for allowing herself to bend to persuasion all those years ago.

Reading this novel with an autobiographical eye makes it all the more poignant with its strong focus on missed opportunities and the pain that can come from leaving only a few words unspoken.

Indeed, Anne says so little throughout the course of the novel that adaptions have often struggled to bring this story to life. All of Anne’s intelligence and kindness are shown in her reflections and actions which are ignored by those around her and even side-lined within the structure of the novel itself in favour of the trivial chatterings of all the supporting characters. Only Austen’s flare for satire could make this technique work so well and keep the reader so resolutely on the side of the shy, retiring (occasional doormat) Anne.

One of my favourite elements of this love story is how beautifully Austen captures Anne’s sensations of being in love. I don’t know about anyone else but when I’m around someone I’ve fallen for it feels like coming down with the flu combined with a prolonged panic attack. Not everyone feels like this but it was immensely comforting for me to see Anne’s sensibilities reacting in much the same way and she is such a sensible character (especially in contrast to those around her) that it didn’t make her or her feelings seem ridiculous.

I love too that it’s not simple, as it never is. A reader can simultaneously see that Captain Wentworth’s anger is entirely understandable, justified even, at the same time as knowing that he’s got it all wrong. Each character, no matter how preposterous, makes perfect sense and each have excellent depth which makes the whole easily correctable situation seem not only real but utterly insurmountable.

Every time I re-read this book, though I know what will happen, I can never quite believe that the solution really will come. Given that it could so easily go wrong at the beginning, that the chances to correct it are so fleeting and so much needs to be explained, it hardly seems possible that, “a word, a look, will be enough,” to put it right.

The Penguin Classic - for when all the other covers have sappy girls in silly hats on them

The Penguin Classic – for when all the other covers have sappy girls in silly hats on them

What do you think? Is Persuasion the best love story ever told? Let us know in the comments.

Posted in Ask the Angels, Interviews, Meet the DA team | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ask the Angels – What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Sheila?

Well, it’s that time of year again. The week of love is here (otherwise known as the week of sympathetically tilting your head to the side whenever you ask a single person what they’re doing this Friday).

We’ve been getting into the Valentine’s Day spirit here at the agency and we thought it was about time we asked Darley’s angels to decide once and for all what the best love story of all time is.

We’ll be posting a new answer every day this week and today it is the turn of our Dramatic Rights Agent, Sheila David:

Sheila, what is the best love story of all time?

My vote goes to Daphne du Maurier’s Frenchman’s Creek.

Set in 17th Century England, the plot sees a frustrated society beauty, running from her meaningless life in London, to try to find some peace and contentment in her house on the Cornish coast.

She finds something else, discovering French smugglers have been using a hidden creek on her land to conceal their ship and evade English justice. The pirate captain is an enigmatic man; artist and adventuring thief, and to whom she becomes both muse and fellow daredevil. They fall in love and go on swashbuckling exploits.

Perhaps not the best fare for Valentine ’s Day unless you hold with the ‘better to have loved and lost’ line of thought. For those who love romance or Cornwall or both.

This is the bleakly demure classic book cover

This is the bleakly demure classic book cover

This is what Hollywood went with

This is what Hollywood went with

What do you think? Is Frenchman’s Creek the best love story of all time? Let us know in the comments.

Posted in Ask the Angels, Interviews, Meet the DA team | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ask the Angels – What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Andrea?

Well, it’s that time of year again. The week of love is here (otherwise known as the week of desperately trying to find a card that doesn’t look like you picked it up last minute at the supermarket round the corner).

We’ve been getting into the Valentine’s Day spirit here at the agency and we thought it was about time we asked Darley’s angels to decide once and for all what the best love story of all time is.

We’ll be posting a new answer every day this week and today we are asking PA to Darley himself and our Office Manager, Andrea Messent:

Andrea, what is the best love story of all time?

The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller.

This is the true story of photographer Robert Kincaid who has a chance encounter with housewife Francesca Johnson while passing through Iowa and they fall in love.

I could not put this beautiful, mesmerising book down and it stayed with me a long time after I’d put it down. It was a touching and also passionate story about two star-crossed lovers and I cried my eyes out!

The film starring Meryl Streep and Clint Eastwood is worth a look too. After the book, of course.

The film starring Meryl Streep and Clint Eastwood is worth a look too. After the book, of course.

What do you think? Is The Bridges of Madison County the best love story of all time? Let us know in the comments.

Posted in Ask the Angels, Interviews, Meet the DA team | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Ask the Angels – What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Emma?

Well, it’s that time of year again. The week of love is here (otherwise known as the week of chocolate and things shaped like hearts culminating in a lot of heart-shaped chocolates).

We’ve been getting into the Valentine’s Day spirit here at the agency and we thought it was about time we asked Darley’s angels to decide once and for all what the best love story of all time is.

We’ll be posting a new answer every day this week. Starting with Rights Assistant, Emma Winter:

Emma, what is the best love story of all time?

For me, it’s immediately (and forever) The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. I love love stories and I’ve read so many over the course of the years, but this one always stays with me. It’s pretty much perfect. It follows Clare and Henry, husband and wife, but Henry has a rare genetic disorder which causes him to time travel. It is this core concept where the novel draws its quiet power.

The idea of exploring both time travel and a couple’s relationship, which begins, although not intimately, when Clare is very young, feels convincing and unique throughout. I’ve never read anything that resonated as deeply and left such an indelible mark. It is both brilliant and devastating and left me crying on the tube (I rarely cry at books, okay I cried at The Fault In Our Stars, so this was interesting).

There is a film too but, as ever, the book was better

There is a film too but, as ever, the book was better

What do you think? Is The Time Traveller’s Wife the best love story of all time? Let us know in the comments.

Posted in Ask the Angels, Interviews, Meet the DA team | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments