Tag Archives: literary agency

Mary Hargreaves’ top podcast recommendations for aspiring authors

Writing – it’s a solitary business. ItMary Hargreaves’s often difficult to stay connected with the wider industry and fellow writers when you’re cooped up with just your keyboard for company. But as author Mary Hargreaves has discovered, one of the best ways of feeling part of the writing community is through the power of podcasts.

Mary, whose debut novel, This Is Not a Love Story, publishes next summer with Trapeze, works full-time alongside her writing and is a big advocate of podcasts being an easy way to keep her passion for writing and reading alive whilst on her commute to work. Here she shares her favourites…

As an author, whatever stage you’re at in your writing career, you will probably fall into one of three camps:

  • Full-time, living-the-dream, oh-my-god-people-are-paying-me-to-just-write
  • Part-time author, part-time money-maker in something bookish/writer-y e.g. journalist or publishing professional.
  • Part-time author, part-time side hustle in something so far removed from the world of books that you almost feel like Spiderman, living a double life and frantically changing your clothes in the staff loos so nobody catches you with the wrong hat on.

Whichever camp you fall into, I think it’s safe to say that you probably love books. The sheer dedication and perseverance it takes to put pen to paper (or finger to keyboard) over and over again until a novel pops out indicates that if you didn’t, you’d have probably chucked the towel in a long time ago.

Personally, I fall into camp three. My day job is wonderful, but it’s about as creative as a boiled egg. With my writing time consigned to the evenings and weekends, it’s sometimes difficult to keep the fire alive as I’m trundling along the rain-soaked streets on a double-decker bus every morning, my head spinning with thoughts of meetings and overdue signatures and my daily ham sandwich vs. superfood salad lunch debate.

Unfortunately, I barf at the thought of reading in a moving vehicle, so I had to find another way to stay connected to the world of words. I am not an audiobook person (they’re great, just not for me) but eventually, with the help of Twitter, I discovered podcasts.

My commute was instantly transformed from a stressful wasted hour to a timeless, thrilling adventure into the minds and lives of incredible authors and their tales of struggle and success, joy and heartbreak and – most importantly of all – favourite reads. I felt connected, like my writing was more than just me and a microwave lasagne at a makeshift desk every evening. Because no matter what camp of author-dom you fall into, you’re doing all the hard stuff yourself, and it can be pretty lonely at times.

Here are four of my absolute favourite bookish podcasts.

You’re Booked – Daisy Buchanan

Daisy Buchanan is a journalist and author, and every week she visits a fellow author’s house and rifles through their bookcase, quizzing her subjects on their reading habits. The author tells us about books that changed them, shaped them and stayed with them, and it’s a goldmine of new discoveries to add to your TBR pile. So far, Daisy has snooped around in the literary collections of Sophie Kinsella, Lucy Vine and Holly Bourne, and her list just keeps growing. It’s also helpful that Daisy has the most gorgeous, soothing voice – perfect for my commute home towards my bed and that next exciting read.

The High Low – Pandora Sykes and Dolly Alderton

Pandora and Dolly are journalists by background, who began their podcast in 2017 (spoiler – it exploded). They discuss, as their tagline goes, ‘current affairs and pop culture’, and they also do ‘author specials’, where they interview writers such as Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené, Fatima Bhutto and David Nicholls. Both Pandora and Dolly are almost unbelievably good at articulating the things we’re all thinking, and I walk away from every episode feeling like my brain has gained 6lbs.

How To Fail With Elizabeth Day

If you think you’re alone in feeling like an imposter, think again. Elizabeth is also a journalist, with an incredible knack for interviewing all kinds of people and extracting the most interesting information from them. Each interviewee (many of whom are writers) recounts three ‘failures’ they have encountered in either their personal or professional life, and heads-up: it can get pretty personal. In an industry where failure is a rite of passage, it’s so reassuring to hear that the likes of Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Sebastian Faulks and David Baddiel aren’t so perfect either.

The Honest Authors’ Show – Gillian McAllister and Holly Seddon

We’re done with the journalists now; Gilly and Holly are authors (cue cheers from the back of the room). Once every three weeks or so, they either chat to each other about their books, lives and writing strife, or interview an author or publishing professional to gain precious insights from their side of the camp. As the title suggests, they’re honest, and I particularly love that they place focus on debut authors such as Imran Mahmood, Will Dean and Lia Louis. It’s (literally) like listening into a conversation between a couple of great friends.

And that’s a wrap. I’m sure there are many more undiscovered nuggets of podcast gold out there, just waiting for my ears to receive them. If you know of any, please do let me know via twitter: @MKHarg

Podcasts have been transformative for me, and have aided in immersing me in a world that I felt so distantly attached to. No matter what kind of author you are, whether you’re querying or a number-one bestseller, I think we could all benefit from an hour-long one-sided chat with our colleagues every once in a while.

A. M. Howell on the highs and lows of the submission process and her journey to publication

In case you misseAM Howelld it (if you’re living under a rock, or have become a hermit, or get all your news delivered by snail), last week was the Frankfurt Book Fair. It’s where everyone announces their big books, and it’s easy to get lost in the buzzy deal headlines and general excitement. And that news is great – but it isn’t necessarily normal.

What we don’t talk about is how many titles don’t get published, or how long it can take agents to find a home for their authors’ books. Publishing is an industry peppered with failures and it’s safe to assume that every single author out there will have faced rejection at some point in their careers.  

Someone who knows this better than most is middle-grade author A. M. Howell. In this week’s post, A. M. Howell gives a brave and honest account of her experiences submitting to agents and of her sometimes difficult journey to publication, as well as some invaluable advice for aspiring authors.

I often think back to summer 2015 when my internet search history mostly consisted of terms like ‘how to get an agent’ and ‘my journey to publication’. I picked up quite a few tips when I was submitting my first book to agents, and since then, and thought it might be helpful to share them, as well as talk a little about my own (quite lengthy!) route to publication.

It’s really tempting to start submitting to agents as soon as you’ve written those magic words ‘The End’ on your manuscript. But it can be really helpful to put your book aside for a few weeks and then re-read with fresh eyes. You may find ways to tighten that tricky ending, develop a character a little more or correct some annoying typos, all things that will help make your story shine even brighter before it goes hurtling out into the world.

Buy or borrow a copy of the latest edition of the Writers and Artists Handbook. It contains a wealth of information on literary agencies and the types of manuscripts they accept. I created a spreadsheet of my top twenty ‘dream agents’ then also visited the individual agency websites to see what was required for submission – normally a full synopsis (detailing the ending), the first few chapters of the book, along with a covering letter.

Do your research and spend some time tailoring your submission – a little personalisation can make you stand out from the crowd. If an agent tweets that they are looking for a comedy about unicorns, and that is what you have written, then you can mention that in your covering letter!

As hard as it may be, try and prepare yourself for some straight rejections. I don’t know a single author who hasn’t received some. It’s natural to be upset, and by all means rant and rave internally, but try and resist firing off an email to the agent saying they are missing out on the next big thing. Agents do, of course, know other agents and word is likely to get around! Focus your efforts on taking on board any feedback you get, grit your teeth and send off another submission.

Many writers and authors I know have had their first book rejected by agents and/or publishers. Try not to be disheartened. If you have received positive feedback it might be worth re-writing. But the best thing might be to start something new. Don’t view that book as wasted work though, as every word you type helps to hone your skills as a writer.

If you do get a full read request from an agent it is time to celebrate! If this is followed up with an offer of representation, your instinct may be to accept immediately and go and eat lots and lots of cake. But perhaps take some time to consider if this agent is good fit for you and your book. When I began submitting my first book, I got some straight rejections, then one agent asked if we could meet. She offered to represent me and I was over the moon, but when we met there was something that just didn’t quite click.

I chased up the other agents who were still reading the full manuscript and then Clare Wallace from The Darley Anderson Children’s Book Agency, an agent at the very top of my wish list, asked if we could chat. We shared the same vision for the book and I didn’t hesitate in saying yes when she offered to represent me.

Clare went on to submit that book to publishers but even though it had positive feedback sadly it didn’t get picked up. I was very upset, but dusted myself off and got back to writing something else to take my mind off the disappointment. But then the very same thing happened with my second book! It wasn’t until my third book that I got to the stage of talking to an editor at a major publishing house on the phone, with the book subsequently going to acquisitions. Clare and I felt quietly positive, but then we got the sad news that while overall they loved the story, the sales team had concerns about sales of similar types of contemporary teen fiction and so they would not be making an offer. This was another real low point and I wondered what to do next. After a few weeks off and chatting things through with Clare, I decided to try something new – historical fiction, something I have always read and enjoyed. I remember sending Clare the first three chapters of what was to become The Garden of Lost Secrets and she emailed me straight back. ‘I love it – just write it,’ she said. So I did.

In the end it was my fourth book – The Garden of Lost Secrets – that was The One that eventually got me the book deal of my dreams with Usborne this year. I guess the moral of this is to stay determined – both at the ‘trying to get an agent stage’ and the ‘trying to get a publisher stage’ but also don’t be afraid to experiment with different genres and styles of writing if what you are writing doesn’t seem to be working. While my first four books will always have a place in my heart, the switch to historical fiction was the best decision I ever made and now I can’t imagine writing anything else!

The Garden of Lost Secrets was published by Usborne in 2019 and has gone on to experience great success. The Times chose it as their Children’s Book of the Week, calling it ‘an impressive debut … [with] an effective twist that goes off with a bang’. It’s also had rave reviews in the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, and the i, and it was picked by The Bookseller as One to Watch, who described A. M. as a ‘brilliant new voice’.

A. M. Howell’s latest book, The House of One Hundred Clocks, will be published in February 2020. It’s full of dark secrets, ticking clocks and mysterious ghostly figures, and you can read an extract here. You can follow A. M. on Twitter and Instagram or visit her website where she shares her future projects.

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Agency Newsletter: March

Yes, it’s true, there’s two! Here’s the March edition, you know what to do. Again, any trouble with the link to Agency Newsletter: March 2017, don’t worry, just scroll underneath the image for all the articles.

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Chris Carter is a No.1 UK Bestseller

It is an absolute pleasure to announce that Chris Carter’s The Caller is a No.1 UK Bestseller.

His eighth Robert Hunter serial killer thriller has beaten Joanna Trollope, Neil Gaiman and Katie Fforde to the top spot on the Sunday Times bestseller chart.

This is Chris’ first No.1, topping his personal best at No.5, and many of his previous titles in the series have been Top 10 UK Bestsellers. As well as having a loyal UK readership, Chris has also achieved huge international success. His titles have been translated into 17 languages and in Germany, one of the biggest book markets in the world, he is a consistent mega-seller.

Chris’ ability to write such convincing killer novels comes from his previous career as a criminal behaviour psychologist, where he interviewed and studied criminals including serial and multiple murderers serving life. In an article for the Mirror he said, ‘I interviewed killers who were as charming, funny and charismatic as a chat show host.’

Congratulations to such a hardworking author who truly deserves his success.

Gillian McAllister débuts at No.6

Gillian McAllister’s arresting début novel, Everything But The Truth, has soared into the charts becoming a No.6 Sunday Times bestseller.

Published by Michael Joseph on 6th March, Gillian scored lots of pre-publication reviews and has since had her novel reviewed in national magazines and press.

The buzz is rightly huge for this emotionally charged novel which makes you question the line between right and wrong.

DA authors dominate Kindle Bestsellers

The Agency has been riding high in the digital charts with three authors hitting the Top 5.

Kerry Fisher’s absorbing, The Silent Wife, went into No.2 on the Kindle bestseller chart and was also a No.1 iBooks and No.2 Kobo bestseller.

TM Logan’s gripping, LIES, scored a No.3 hit on both the Kindle and iBooks chart. And K.L. Slater’s page-turning, BLINK, went to No.2 on the Kindle chart.

At one time, DA Agency authors made up a quarter of the Top 20 with B.A. Paris’ The Breakdown and Martina Cole’s Dangerous Lady boosting the number to five.

Congratulations all!

Dangerous Lady continues to thrill

In Martina Cole’s 25th anniversary year, her very first novel, Dangerous Lady, has rocketed back into the bestseller chart.

The iconic novel launched Martina Cole’s phenomenal career and has been released as a special anniversary edition in hardback. Dangerous Lady also made a splash on the digital charts, reaching No.12!

We can say with great confidence that is just the beginning of a very special year for the undisputed Queen of Crime.

Needlework nominated

Deirdre Sullivan’s stunning YA novel, Needlework, has been nominated for a CBI Book of the Year Award 2017.

The CBI Book Awards are literary awards presented annually in the Republic of Ireland to writers and illustrators of books for children and young people. Previous winners include Eoin Colfer and John Boyne.

Congratulations, Deirdre!

A Seven-Letter Word wins

Kim Slater’s second Carnegie nominated novel, A Seven-Letter Word, has won the St Helen’s Libraries Book Awards (BASH) 2017.

The St Helen’s Book Award is a fantastic regional Book Award scheme for secondary school pupils, celebrating fiction for ages 11-18.

A huge congratulations to Kim!

 

 

 

 

Agency Newsletter: February

Hi again,

A sheepish return to the blog as this newsletter comes a little later than anticipated. However, rest assured the reason for delay is all due to a staggeringly busy couple of months. With the London and Bologna book fairs, this is one of the most exciting times of the year but very much requires an ‘all hands on deck’ approach.

Anyway, it’s here now. I’ll let the newsletter speak for itself, so much exciting stuff. If you are having trouble with the link to Agency Newsletter: February 2017, scroll down for all of the articles.

Happy Wednesday!

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Margaret Dickinson is a Top 10 smash hit!

The Queen of Saga returns with another bestselling novel. Daughters of Courage, the sequel to Top 10 bestseller The Buffer Girls, soared to No.9 after its first full week of sales.

This is Margaret’s 24th novel and second year in a row she has been a Sunday Times Bestseller. Her loyal readership got the chance to meet her at a number of signings which took place across the UK.

Margaret even made an appearance on BBC’s Bargain Hunt, discussing the legacy of the Buffer Girls of Sheffield and how they inspired her characters and their stories.

Margaret is highly regarded by everyone she works with for having an incredible work ethic and Darley Anderson has said, ‘She is the constant professional in everything she does. No one deserves success more than she does.’ We couldn’t agree more.

Congratulations Margaret, here’s to the many more successes to come.

The Breakdown is a UK bestseller

The hotly anticipated second novel from the international début sensation, B.A. Paris, has rocketed into the Bestsellers chart.

The Breakdown soared to No.11 on the Sunday Times Bestsellers, and also made a huge splash on iBooks going straight to No.1 and on Amazon’s Kindle Chart, as a No.6 bestseller. Since first appearing in the Kindle Top 20, The Breakdown has not dropped out!

We are so proud of our author and cannot wait to see what happens next!

DA Children’s Agency News

It’s been a fantastic month for the Children’s Agency. Three of our authors have been longlisted for Reading Rampage 2017. Polly Ho-Yen’s Where Monsters Lie, Kim Slater’s Smart and Vanessa Altin’s The Pomegranate Tree have all been chosen for the city wide event in Leicester which aims to promote Reading for Pleasure to children and young people.

And Dave Rudden’s Knights of the Borrowed Dark has won the Most Read Award at the SLA Great Reads Awards. Instead of a trophy, the students gave him a light bulb as a nod to one of the most memorable parts of the story.

Congratulations to all!

Catherine Steadman joins DA Agency

We are absolutely thrilled to welcome new talent Catherine Steadman to the Darley Anderson Agency! Her novel, Something In The Water, is an unpredictable and darkly funny début, with an utterly compelling voice.

Kate Miciak from Bantam Bell snapped up the US rights at auction and said, ‘From the opening sentence to its final gorgeous revelation, I was enthralled…I read the pages in one greedy gulp…and then couldn’t stop obsessing about it.’ Italian translation rights were pre-empted overnight and Swedish rights have already sold.

Catherine is a Laurence Olivier Award nominated actress and writer based in North London. She is known for her roles in Downton Abbey and Tutankhamun, starring alongside Sam Neill, as well as shows including The Inbetweeners and The Tudors.

Dangerous Lady returns

The first novel from the inimitable Martina Cole, Dangerous Lady, returns in a very special 25th anniversary hardback edition.

Over the course of her illustrious year, Martina has sold sixteen million print copies and 1.2 million e-books.

And Dangerous Lady was the book that started it all.

The Last Night takes Bronze

We are thrilled to announce that The Last Night by Cesca Major won the Bronze Award in the Historical Fiction category of TBC Charlie Awards. The Book Club is an online reading group made up of over 6500 compulsive readers and approximately 900 authors. Every year the TBC Charlie Awards celebrate the authors with prizes awarded in 16 different categories.

Congratulations Cesca!

CWA Dagger in the Library

We are delighted to announce that Tana French has been longlisted for the prestigious Dagger in the Library Award for the CWA Daggers 2017!

The Dagger in the Library recognises the author’s entire body of work rather than just one book.

Congratulations Tana!

 

 

 

An Interview with Beth Reekles

Beth Reekles is the teen sensation behind THE KISSING BOOTH, officially one of the world’s most influential teenagers and the newest author to join the Darley Anderson Children’s Book Agency, agented by Clare Wallace.

Beth Reekles - teen sensation

Beth Reekles – teen sensation

At fifteen, Beth began uploading her debut novel THE KISSING BOOTH to story-sharing platform Wattpad, where it quickly accumulated over 19 million reads. She was picked up by Random House UK at the age of seventeen while she was still doing her A Levels.

Now studying Physics at Exeter University, Beth has already had THE KISSING BOOTH, ROLLING DICE, and OUT OF TUNE all published with Random House along with being shortlisted for multiple awards, receiving the Scout Birthday Honours Writing Badge and having been named one of Time magazine’s 16 Most Influential Teenagers in 2013 she has just been listed at No.6 on The Times’ Top 20 Under 25 list.

The Times August 2014 close up USE

Here’s a picture of the article irl, just in case you’re not subscribed…

In celebration of Beth joining the agency, Emma Winter was able to grab a moment with Beth to discuss the realities of being a published author, where she gets her inspiration and what she’s reading this summer!

Emma Winter: When did you tell your parents that you were contributing to WattPad? Were they surprised by your success?

Beth Reekles: I told them about three months into posting my first story on Wattpad that I was posting a book I was writing online and it had maybe twenty thousand reads at that point. They didn’t really know what to say – and had nothing to compare the number of reads to, so didn’t think much of it.

When The Kissing Booth started getting 400,000, then 900,000, then two million, then five million, reads, they started to take more notice. They were certainly surprised when I revealed I’d been writing avidly since they gave me a laptop when I was twelve, and I hadn’t told them all that time!

EW: Has being a published author been anything like you expected?

BR: It’s been a complete whirlwind, and it’s all happened very quickly! I don’t really know what I was expecting from being a published author, but it’s certainly been very exciting – meeting other authors, being on TV to talk about my books… and I still go looking for my book every time I go into a Waterstones!

EW: Where did you, or where do you, get your inspiration from?

BR: I’ve always written the kind of books I like to read. When I was younger, I wrote more fantasy, but the last few years I’ve preferred teen romance. I look to teen movies, YA books, and movie and TV soundtracks when I need inspiration. And, I’ve always admired JK Rowling, and find her a huge source of inspiration.

JK Rowling - inspiring generations

JK Rowling – inspiring generations

EW: Do you ever find inspiration hard to come by? If so, what do you do when this happens?

BR: Sometimes if I get stuck on a book, I try watching movies or reading books in the same genre as I’m writing, but if that doesn’t work, I’ll put on some soundtracks to something like Game of Thrones, Doctor Who, or Pirates of the Caribbean – usually they’re exciting and motivational enough in themselves to get me writing, but they also make for great background music.

EW: What were your favourite bits to write in your novels?

BR: I love writing dramatic scenes – when everything seems to be going wrong for the protagonist, it’s always the most fun to write.

EW: What was the hardest bit?

BR: The hardest bit is almost always the start. I’ll come up with the ideas for the novel, and have an idea of where I want it to go, but I always find it hard to figure out the best way to start the book. I must’ve had a dozen different first chapters for The Kissing Booth before I found one I could work with.

EW: Where’s your writing space and what’s your writing process like?

BR: I usually write in my bedroom. When I was in school, I couldn’t write in the daytime, so I used to write later on in the evening and at night. And as for my writing process, I’ve never been able to plot stories – I always end up with a two totally different stories! I tend to come up with a blurb for the story and my characters first, and work from there.

EW: What would your top three YA romance films be?

BR: John Tucker Must Die, 10 Things I Hate About You, and Easy A.

Author-approved films by Beth Reekles

Author-approved films by Beth Reekles

EW: How did you feel when you were listed on Time’s ‘Most Influential Teen’ list of 2013?

BR: It was incredible! I had no idea about it beforehand, so when I saw it online I ran around my flat at uni waking people up to tell them. It was brilliant to be on the same list as people like Malia Obama, Malala, and Lorde.

EW: What are you reading this summer?

BR: I’ve read 23 books this summer already, and I’ve still got a huge pile left I’d like to get through! At the top of my to-be-read pile is Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell, The Probability of Miracles by Wendy Wunder, Solitaire by Alice Oseman, and A Dance With Dragons by George RR Martin.

Wow, that's a lot of books. Better write faster, George.

Wow, that’s a lot of books. Better write faster, George.

EW: Tell us one thing most people don’t know about you

BR: I do a lot of knitting in my spare time. My grandmother taught me when I was little and I took it up again about two years ago. It’s really relaxing, and I’m working on a massive cable-stitch blanket.

EW: Do you have any advice for aspiring writers?

BR: Write, write, write! They say practice makes perfect, and if you want to write, just write. Even if you never show it to anyone, it’ll be such a great feeling when you finish your first book. I’d also recommend posting some of your work up to a site like Wattpad. It’s really encouraging to see people reading and enjoying your work, and the communities are really supportive.

EW: And one last bonus question – Can you pitch each of your novels in a tweet?

BR: What would you do if you fell for your best friend’s brother? That’s what happens to Elle – but can her friendship with bestie Lee survive? (The Kissing Booth)

The Kissing Booth

Starting a new school is the perfect time to reinvent yourself. But does Madison stay with the cool kids at school or stand by the nerd? (Rolling Dice)

Rolling Dice

Ashley’s life is perfect on paper, but new boy-next-door Todd is going to make her realise that none of her life is as it seems… (Out of Tune)

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THE KISSING BOOTH, ROLLING DICE and OUT OF TUNE are available to buy now. Get your copies today and follow Beth on twitter for all the latest updates.

What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Camilla?

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! (Otherwise known as the day we finally settled the immortal question of just what is the best love story ever told.)

All this week we’ve been giving Darley’s angels a chance to vote for the love story that they think should win the title of Best Love Story of All Time.

Emma, Andrea, Sheila, Vicki and Clare have all nominated their favourites and now agent Camilla Wray has the final word:

Camilla, what is the best love story of all time?

The question of which is my favourite love story is something that has been tucked into my pocket and carried around all week. There are definitely the greatest love stories of all; Love Story, Romeo & Juliet, The Time Traveller’s Wife to name only a few. Tales where One Great Love smashes through a life leaving everyone dizzy and breathless. But with these stories there is also the greatest sadness.

Tragedy is One Great Love’s best friend and as a loveaholic the danger of our addiction is the gut-wrenching catastrophic effect death has on love.

So with my Valentine’s heart on my sleeve I’m unable to cope with considering the thought of such sadness. This is why my answer is turning to what I call the Quiet Love Stories. A love not without history, drama or disaster, but it is grown from hope, kindness and a calmness that allows you just to be, together, forever.

For me a book that has this in every way is Jilly Cooper’s The Man Who Made Husband’s Jealous.

It doesn’t have the intensity, plotting or perhaps epic proportions of the great love stories, but it is the Queen and King partnership of Quiet Love and it really touched my heart.

Lysander Hawkley is a beautiful, lost and misjudged man. He’s a son that craves attention from his father and a human that just wants to belong. When he meets Kitty, the plump, average wife of tyrant Rannaldini, they start an unlikely courtship; one full of the laughter,
support and gentleness neither have ever been allowed before. And it is through these moments of being that a Quiet Love is born.

Alongside this wonderful love story is also that of the infamous Rupert Campbell-Black and Taggie O’Hara. All Jilly Cooper fans will have an opinion on ravishing Rupert and in the series he’s a dark character with his demons and danger a plenty. As the series progresses though we have flashes of an unexpected man and our defences are broken down. He is a man of honour and loyalty, yet he’s also a child at heart and someone craving a love that will quietly hold him up until he can believe in himself.

Taggie O’Hara is his Quiet Love. A coltish beauty who sufferers from terrible shyness and dyslexia she represents to him everything he isn’t, and it is Rupert recognising this in Taggie that makes him a better man.

Quiet love

Quiet love

What do you think? Is The Man Who Made Husbands Jealous the best love story ever told? Did you side with any of the other angels instead? Or perhaps you think we’re all crackers and completely failed to mention the obvious winner?

Cast your vote in the comments below.

What’s the Best Love Story of All Time, Clare?

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! (Otherwise known as the day where people seem to be carrying around a lot more flowers than is usual.)

It’s time for us to decide once and for all what the best love story of all time is.

All this week we’ve been posting a new answer each day from one of Darley’s angels. But because today is the big day of love itself we’re giving you two answers for the price of one from two of our top agents nonetheless.

Let’s get the day off to a LOVEly start with our Head of Rights and Associate Agent, Clare Wallace:

Clare, what is the best love story of all time?

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Read it before the film comes out later this year

Read it before the film comes out later this year

Okay, so this probably isn’t the ‘best’ love story of all time. But when Vicki asked us to write a Valentine’s article for the blog this was the first title I thought of.

For those of you who haven’t already read The Fault in Our Stars (and if you haven’t go and start reading it, like, now) it’s about a teenage girl, Hazel, who has terminal lung cancer and is encouraged by her parents to attend a cancer support group. Here she meets the charming, witty, gorgeous, and in remission, Augustus Waters.

This book is about a lot of things besides cancer, and love is one of them. The two main characters are beautifully drawn; they are bright, funny, courageous, and warm. They are exceptional people in exceptional circumstances. They are also two angsty teenagers falling in love.

At times I found this book difficult to read. The reality of a serious illness doesn’t make for light escapism. But I couldn’t put it down. I smiled and winced and laughed and cried (on the tube) and was absorbed in every word of Hazel’s story, right to its breathtaking, heartbreaking, star-crossed conclusion.

*breaks down sobbing*

*breaks down sobbing*

What do you think? Is The Fault in Our Stars the best love story of all time? Let us know in the comments.